Tatts, Fashion, Music and more

The Origin Of Tattoos….

A tattoo is made by the inserting indelible ink into the dermis layer of the skin to change the pigment. Tattoos on humans are a type of body modification. They are also used on animals as an identification purpose. The 1st written reference “tattoo” also known as {Samoan Tatau} appears in the journal of  Joseph Banks around the year 1769. “I shall mention they mark themselves indelibly”….

  <<<< Tattooing has been practiced for centuries in many cultures spread throughout the world. The Ainu, the indigenous people of Japan, traditionally had facial tattoos. Today one can find Hausa people of North Nigeria, Arabic people in East Turkey and Atayal of Taiwan with facial tattoos.>>>>

Mattel's Stylin' Tattoos Barbie, 2011

 

>>>Tattooing was widespread among various people as a tribal branding. Since the 90’s, tattoos have become a more mainstream part of global and western fashion. Its common amongst both sexes, to all economic classes, and to age groups from the later teen years to middle age. By 2010 even the BARBIE doll put out a tattooed barbie this year (2011) which was accepted, although it did attract some controversy. >>>

 

 

 

>>>There is  a connection between the Taklamakan people and the Crimean Scyths, the Celts and the Picts. Picts is the name the Russians called the people which meant “The Painted People”. They likely influenced the “indigenous” tattooing of the tribal people of India, and were connected to the Jomon culture of Japan (ancestors of the tattooed Ainu mentioned earlier). There is credible evidence that some of the tattooing tribes of northern Asia migrated to become bigger tribes in the Americas also. In 1986, it was reported that some of these mummies bore tattoos in “geometric” patterns. However, those images of the tattoos were not been published in any accessible form. The History of tattooing and how it started will amaze you if it hasn’t already.>>>

Here is a tattoo on the right arm of a Scythian chieftain whose mummy was discovered in Russia

>>>>In 1912, Koita People Tattooing among females of New Guinea, traditionally began at age 5. Each year another was added on with the V-shaped tattoo on the chest representing that she had reached her marriageable year. With various different traditions in many different countries you see that tattooing had a totally different meaning depending on the tribe and its culture. >>>>

 

 

Tattoos & Religion

 >>> There is no consistent Christian view on tattooing. Christian symbols are common in the society of people who follow this particular religion. There is no prohibition against tattoos within the Catholic church, provided that they tattoo isn’t a picture that is sacrilegious, blasphemous, or obscene. In Islam, tattoos are considered forbidden in Sunni Islam. It is believed that tattooing is forbidden because it involves changing the creation of God. The use of temporary tattoos made with Henna, is very common and is considered permissible. In Judaism, tattoos are also forbidden. Based on the Torah (Religious Book) it states, “You shall not make gashes in your flesh for the dead, or incise any marks on yourselves”.  Neopagans can use the process and the outcome of tattooing as an expression or representation of their own beliefs. Many tattooist websites display pagan images as example of the minds of artwork they provide. 

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Henna Tattooing

A Woman from the Koita Tribe, 1912

A Girl from The Koita Tribe, 1912

<<< On the left, is a picture of a female from the Koita tribe which was mentioned earlier.

To the Right is a picture of Henna tattooing which is permissible in the Islamic religion which was also mentioned earlier>>>>

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s